Wet Screening

Archaeology is messy work, but sometimes things get really wet and muddy! Elenore and Teresa are practicing here what is called “wet screening.” Wet screening is similar to dry screening as you try to get all the sediment through a mesh screen, but water is used to wash away any particularly thick lumps of sediment. Once all the dirt has been washed through the screen, any rocks or artifacts will be left behind to find. This is a particularly effective way of dealing with heavy clay or bulk soil samples, but requires a lot of water and a place that you don’t mind getting messy!

Happy Birthday!

Ever wonder what happens to that balloon that slipped from your fingers as a kid? What goes up must come down. This particular happy birthday balloon was found 30 km from the closest town, but it probably came from much further away. It wasn’t Matt’s birthday, but it did bring some much needed entertainment to the day!

Jack’s and Jane’s of all trades

Working in the field of archaeology requires more than a good eye to spot artifacts and a willingness to work away from home. Archaeologists are required to be a “Jane of all trades” meaning we have to be able to keep a cool head when things don’t go our way and  problem solve our ways out of it. Whether this means fixing a tire on the side of the highway, MacGyvering an ATV repair or getting our ATVs out of sticky situations.